Monday, June 21, 2010

What do you do with good ole boys like me?

This year the term "good ole boy" has been maligned. Politicians have hijacked that term and defined it as corrupt.  Emails and comments on this blog accuse me of being a good ole boy.  Frankly, I hope I am one.

Having actually grown up in a rural town in South Carolina and living in one now, I can tell you the politicians have it wrong.  A good ole boy volunteers for the local fire department or for local charities.  A good old boy is a guy you can count on.  For example, a man might say that after he lost his job, "Frankie loaned me $500 to pay my mortgage."  The response would be "Yeah, that Frankie, he is a good ole boy."  

Good ole boys in the South are Black, Hispanic and White.  Good ole boys tend to work hard for their money, believe in traditional values, like their guns and hunting, and try their best to do what's right.  Good ole boys take care of their families and look after their neighbors.  They do not have the time to hate and plot like politicos do.  Good ole boys are too busy trying to the right thing.  


Some good ole boys are religious.  Some are not. Some good ole boys drink too much, some don't drink at all.  Good ole boys like barbecue, college football and mama's fried chicken.  Good ole boys don't like big government, but they want the government that they do have to be able to work for the people.  Good ole boys will be there when you need them, and they don't care about how much money you have, who you work for, or yes, what color your skin is. 


Though we good ole boys come up short, we were taught things about doing right, never taking advantage of the weak, looking after widows, and standing up for what we believe in.  


That was the definition of good ole boy I learned growing up.  I grew up around great men.  My grandpa and my dad, and men, both black and white, I worked for or had as coach or scoutmaster, who are still heroes to me and they all were good ole boys.  

As a boy, I went to sleep with an attic fan and smells of a Southern Summer.  I fished and followed the Braves and was taught to respect my elders and the sacrifices that they made in wars.  I hauled hay and worked in a cotton mill.  From that I learned who good ole boys really were. I wonder sometimes if any of the political professionals who so malign that term every opened a bale of cotton or put a bale of hay on a truck. 


Country music singer Don Williams sums it up with this song.  It does beg the question, what do you do with good ole boys like me? 


12 comments:

  1. Lord RocksJune 21, 2010

    Jakie Knotts with a law degree. NO wonder you do Wilson's dirty work.

    Richard Brian McCarty, a proud redneck with a failed career.

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  2. AnonymousJune 21, 2010

    We take them out back and beat the shit out them.

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  3. Somewhere, Lewis Grizzard is proud of you.

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  4. AnonymousJune 21, 2010

    Well said. This is the South. Some people would pefer it "Changed" in to something that they believe is more PC. They don't understand that being "good" is what makes our culture unique. i.e. Southern Hospitality. Haley told the Sons of Confederate Vets, The Civil War was about Tradition vs. Change. Well, we all know change for the sake of change is what got us into the mess we're in. Haley only knows slogans, doesn't even know, or understand, our history. My father, grandfather and husband would all be considered "good ole boys" and they all vote.

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  5. AnonymousJune 21, 2010

    There's a group of politicians in Columbia who grew up just like the good ole boys you describe. They watch each other's back, they try to keep their voting record secret, they misuse tax money, they give their friends jobs, they get rich using your money while giving nothing back to the state, they keep our schools last in every catagory, and they use dirty political tactics to oust anyone who tries to shine light on what they do. And you're proud of that. God help us.

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  6. Motorcycle ManJune 22, 2010

    Anonymous, see your doctor. There are several medications available to help you get your head out of your ass.

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  7. Motorcycle ManJune 22, 2010

    Oh, and btw the way, I am proud be a good ole boy under Brian's definition and I am voting for Haley. Read before you comment.

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  8. AnonymousJune 24, 2010

    Anonymous said,
    "There's a group of politicians in Columbia who grew up just like the good ole boys you describe. They watch each other's back, they try to keep their voting record secret, they misuse tax money, they give their friends jobs, they get rich using your money while giving nothing back to the state, they keep our schools last in every catagory, and they use dirty political tactics to oust anyone who tries to shine light on what they do"

    I couldn't have described the Haley/Sanfraud reign of deceit better myself. Remember in November-Wilbur Smith and Lexington Med with more to come

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  9. AnonymousJune 26, 2010

    Richard, you bring up memories of the best of the South with this post. Good luck in getting your term "good ole boy" back. But, I fear like the word, "gay" it is lost forever to the political types.

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  10. Perhaps your best post in months.

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  11. What does a Southern belle like myself do with good old boys like this? Hehehe...the answer is...VERY bad, bad things! :)~

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  12. It's about time someone got it right. It seems to me that the public, outside of the South, has gotten the wrong impression of what a good ole boy is. It makes me so angry to hear them referred to an unintelligent and rude redneck men. My mama always wanted me to marry a good ole boy and for good reason! Your definition is perfect :) Now we just need to remind them how wonderful and friendly the South can be and that the Southern Belle hasn't phased out either

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